Season(s) 2012: the new and the independent ftw

Last night La Boite Theatre announced its 2012 or ‘twenty twelve’ season on their fresh look website complete with a maroon coloured (Queensland?) splattered torso – not quite sure what that’s about but, as with the new-look QTC logo (below) your guess as to meaning – if you need that kind of thing – is as good as mine.

The other big house in town, Queensland Theatre Company announced its 2012 season a few weekends ago. Artistic Director Wesley Enoch launched 2012’s mainstage productions along with new logo and website. I was at QTC’s launch but couldn’t make it to La Boite’s despite their generosity of an invitation which, I understood, was a pretty hot ticket – as was QTC’s for their launch. Theatre goers in town are clearly keen to see what the two ADs have in mind. Continue reading Season(s) 2012: the new and the independent ftw

Where do the writers come from?

This entry is part 1 of 11 in the series Facts & Figures

As promised in the last post, here are the first of some stats as they relate to the 2011 programmed seasons of both Brisbane’s subsidised, professional theatre companies. This post is the first in a series for Greenroom’s readers, and forms part of my ongoing research into professional theatre in Queensland. I have used data relating to both company’s programmed works as it appears in published brochures or online: mainstage, education, studio, and ‘indie’ presenting partnerships. This work picks up on some research I did last year which related to the first 10 and the last 10 years of the repertoire for Queensland Theatre Company. You can check that out here and here on my personal blog. From this year I’ve included La Boite’s programming under current AD David Berthold.

Continue reading Where do the writers come from?

Queensland Theatre Company: Applications for Artistic Director position now open

Queensland Theatre Company has today advertised for the position of Artistic Director in local, national, and international media.

The advertisement and downloadable media statement can also be found on the Company website.  Here’s the ad:

Artistic Director

Queensland Theatre Company is seeking a bold, visionary theatre maker to provide artistic leadership to one of Australia’s major performing arts companies.

Based in Brisbane, Australia’s fastest growing capital city, the Company has a 40 year history of providing audiences with a diverse range of productions and a long-term commitment to regional Queensland.

The Company supports the community and the arts sector through a range of education, artform and artist development activities.

Critical to this position is the ability to articulate an inspiring vision and to deliver productions and activities that will engage, entertain and provoke audiences, and continue the development of theatre in Queensland and beyond.

For more information, please contact:
Tony Grierson
Braithwaite Steiner Pretty Executive Search
+612 8905 3726 or qtc@bspes.com
Applications close Friday 21 May

Flicking the Flint: !Metro Arts Independents 2010

Flicking the Flint
Created by Kate Lee
Written by Anna Krien

Featuring Kate Lee, Tom McCosker and Jackson O’Sullivan

Set and Costume Design by Kasia Janczewski
Composed by Bernard Houston
Percussion by Tim McConnachie
Lighting Design by Jason Glenwright

Season: Wed 10 – Sat 27 March 2010

Preview: 7:30pm Tue 9 March 2010

Opening: 7:30pm Wed 10 March 2010

Artist Talk: Wed 17 March 2010

When: Wed – Sat: 7:30pm

Where: Sue Benner Theatre

Tickets: Adults $20/ Conc. $16/ Preview $12/ Group (10+) $12

Bookings: (07) 3002 7100 or Book Online

Letters from a voluntary exile: Melbourne

GUEST POST: Nick Backstrom is an actor and writer, formerly based in Brisbane and more recently in Melbourne.  He also sings, teaches and directs, though rarely at the same time.  Nick’s Melbourne relocation will form the basis of his occasional posts to Greenroom.  He would be delighted to respond to any comments or queries made here.

Like many before me, and more to come, I have been lured away from Brisbane to Melbourne for – well, more work really. That and a summer that doesn’t last half a year, leaving you living in a slick of your own sweat.

I’ve been here a little over a month.  In a previous sojourn south, made for the purpose, I was fortunate to get the services of a very good agent.  Already I have had two auditions for a major TV series.  They were very different animals to the auditions I had in Brisbane.  Being in Melbourne, of course, means you’re nearer the source.  In practice this means reading for better parts, with better information and talking to the actual directors.  Casting agents do their best, but it is another level away from the person who will make the decision, another degree of separation.

Both my audition scripts were at least four pages of dialogue, involving two scenes.  The last audition I did in Brisbane was eight words.  This gave me a little more to work with.  It also meant I could give the character a journey, and the audition actually felt like acting.  Also I was able to go to the studio beforehand and read the entire episode to give the scenes context.  I felt so much better informed, and better armed going into the audition.

The audition itself was different as well.  It’s still you, a reader and a camera in a room but working with the director, giving you feedback and direction.  I was suddenly aware of a weight of expectation from the director that I have not felt before.  Many times we are told that the directors are hoping you are the person they are going to cast.   For the first time in a film/TV audition I had that sense.  I wasn’t there to fill a quota to satisfy requirements from the State Government for money, I was there because they thought I might be the one they want.

In short I felt in making the move to Melbourne I had taken a big step up in getting worthwhile, well-paid roles on TV.

In short, I felt in making the move to Melbourne I had taken a big step up in getting worthwhile, well-paid roles on TV. Kudos and more power to series such as Sea Patrol which genuinely audition and actually cast Queensland actors in good roles, but they still remain the exception.

I am slowly getting out and about and seeing theatre and meeting theatre makers.  I have an audition coming up for a role in a major production.  Of course, we miss more auditions than we get, but you’ve got to be in it to win.  I’ll let you know more, as more happens.

Love and mercy to you and your friends.

Flloyd Kennedy (Interview 3)

Image of Flloyd Kennedy

Brisbane has the right to a healthy layer of DIY theatre – partially supported and encouraged, venue or company based – in professional, independent companies that evolve.  People need to be empowered to work outside the prevalent bureaucratic funding model. My passion is theatre where performers do their thing – performers in an empty room – not big sets and costume stuff.  Then the audience brings its own life, energy and imagination to it; that’s the kind of theatre I love – that’s fringe.

I spoke a little while back with Flloyd Kennedy actor, blogger, voice-coach, theatre-maker and enthusiast.  She’s so committed to the importance of theatre-making that she (initially) single-handedly organised the inaugural one-day Bits Festival of fringe theatre held in Brisbane last November.  I was intrigued by the concept and keen to talk with Flloyd about what brought her to do such an extraordinary thing – creating a fringe festival event from scratch is hardly for the faint of heart, but then that’s not a label that would stick long to Flloyd.

… there is still not the opportunity here for audiences to experience new ideas or for rough, raw, experimental work to get a first showing. There’s still a missing layer.. Continue reading Flloyd Kennedy (Interview 3)